Skip to main content

Search

Emergency Preparedness: Being Prepared During Times of Disaster. Important Tips for Horse Owners

Written by the AAEPIn the event of a disaster, your veterinarian knows how important it is for you as a horse owner to have pre-planned actions and proper...

A. Kent Allen, DVM Preparation for emergencies at an eventing compe- tition is an exercise in advance planning and seam- less cooperation to make it seem...

Not a member?

Click below to become a member now

Join
Already a member?

Log in now to view this content

Written by the AAEPIn the event of a disaster, your veterinarian knows how important it is for you as a horse owner to have pre-planned actions and proper...

Emergency Preparedness: Being Prepared During Times of Disaster. Important Tips for Horse Owners
Overview

Written by the AAEP

In the event of a disaster, your veterinarian knows how important it is for you as a horse owner to have pre-planned actions and proper information to make rapid decisions that may save your horse’s and even your own life. 

ASSESS YOUR RISKS 

What are the most likely disasters in your area? (flood, fire, tornado, hurricane, nuclear accident, disease threat, chemical spill, ice storm, etc.) For each type disaster, check:

· What are your major vulnerabilities?

· What can you do to minimize the damage?

· What plans do you have in place?

· Who do you need to contact? 

BEFORE THE EVENT 

· Take a careful look at your property and identify the best place for your animals in each type of disaster you consider. 

· Prepare for the possibility you might want to evacuate (check with your local veterinarian, law enforcement, animal control, or Ag extension agent for routes and recommendations). 

· Find several alternative locations and check the entry requirements for each. Be sure to have agreements arranged for your animals in advance.

· Prepare an ID packet for each horse: age, sex, breed, color, registrations, unique ID’s, photos, microchip numbers, etc. 

· Write down any special feeding instructions; list any medications with dosage; record the name and phone number of your prescribing veterinarian. 

· Be sure all vaccinations and medical records are in writing and up-to-date. Have current Coggins test records and consult with your veterinarian for other recommended immunizations or tests. 

· Take records with you. Records left at home may be damaged or destroyed during a disaster. 

· Check for alternate water sources. Have fresh water and hay available for 48-72 hours. 

· Keep trailers and vans well maintained and full of fuel. 

· Keep insurance coverage current and adequate. 

· Consider an event where you might by unable to save/evacuate all your animals. Make a priority list. Familiarize family and farm personnel with the list in case you are not there when the disaster occurs. 

Prepare an emergency kit for a minimum of 72-hour care, which include: 

· Plastic trash barrel with lid 

· Tarpaulins 

· Water buckets 

· First aid items 

     - Betadine or Nolvasan solutions

     - Antibiotic ointment

     - Gauze squares and bandages

     - Ichthammol ointment (feet)

     - Tranquilizer injections (optional)

     - Eye ointment 

· Portable radio, flashlight and extra batteries

· Fire resistant, non-nylon leads and halters 

· Knife, scissors, wire cutters 

· Duct tape 

· Livestock markers or paint 

· Leg wraps 

· Lime and bleach/disinfectant 

DEVELOP A BUDDY SYSTEM 

Talk with a neighbor or friend and make arrangements to check on each other after a disaster. Tell one another if you are evacuating and to where, so authorities will know. Buddies may agree to pool resources, such as generators, water tanks, trailers, etc. Permanently identify each horse by tattoo, microchip, brand, tag, photographs (front, rear, left and right side) and/or drawing. If disaster strikes before you can do this, paint or etch hooves, use neck or pastern bands, or paint your telephone number or last four digits of SSN on the side of the animal. 

PRACTICE YOUR PLAN 

When disaster strikes, remain calm and follow your plan! Remember it is vital to be able to leave early in any mandatory evacuation to avoid getting stalled in traffic and create unnecessary hardships. 

AFTER AN EVENT 

· Notify family, friends and officials that you are OK and whether you stayed or evacuated. Use phones, radios, Internet, signs or word of mouth. 

· Inspect your premises carefully before turning our horses. Look for foreign materials (tin, glass, nails) and downed fences or power lines. 

· Be careful leaving your animals unattended outside. Familiar scents and landmarks may be altered, and your horses could easily become confused and lost. 

· Check with your veterinarian or State Veterinarian’s office for information of any disease threats that may exist because of the situation. 

· If you find other horses, use extreme caution in handling, and work in pairs if possible. Keep the horse contained and isolated, and notify authorities as soon as possible. 

· If any horses are lost, contact local authorities. 

BE PREPARED TO IDENTIFY AND DOCUMENT OWNERSHIP WHEN CLAIMING LOST HORSES. 

Listen to the emergency alert system (EAS) for information about locating lost animals.

Emergency and Disaster Preparedness

When an emergency or natural disaster occurs, it is always in the best interest of the horses for both the equine practitioner and the horse owner to be...

Owner Emergency and Disaster Preparedness

When an emergency or natural disaster occurs, it is always in the best interest of the horses for both the equine practitioner and the horse owner to be...

New Jersey Practice Owner Joins AAEP Board of Directors

Daniel P. Keenan, DVM, owner of Foundation Equine Wellness and Performance in Crosswicks, N.J., has joined the board of directors of the American Association...

AAEP Resources Help Practitioners, Horse Owners Prepare for Natural Disasters

AAEP urges horse owners to revisit disaster protocols The American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) encourages horse owners and veterinary...

Request Grant Funding from the AAEP Foundation by May 1

The American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) Foundation is accepting applications for funding from non-profit organizations that share its mission...

Renowned Equine Dentistry Specialist from Kentucky to Serve as AAEP Treasurer

Jack Easley, DVM, DABVP, DAVDC, a private practitioner and noted equine dentistry specialist in Shelbyville, Ky., has been named treasurer of the American...

Applications for Funding Through the AAEP Foundation Due May 1

The American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) Foundation is accepting applications for funding from non-profit organizations and individuals that...

AAEP Foundation Funds Efforts to Aid Horses Affected by Severe Weather

May 22, 2013The Foundation offers support through its Equine Disaster Relief Fund Relief organizations responding to equine emergencies in the aftermath...

Veterinarians and Horse Owners Urged to Prepare for Natural Disasters

August 28, 2012The American Association of Equine Practitioners implores horse owners and veterinary professionals to review an action plan for equine-related...

AAEP Resources Help Practitioners, Horse Owners Prepare for Hurricane

August 25, 2011 AAEP urges horse owners to revisit disaster protocol as Hurricane Irene approaches East Coast As Hurricane Irene moves toward the...

AAEP Foundation Funds Efforts to Aid Horses Affected by Severe Weather

May 27, 2011 The Foundation offers support through its Emergency Relief Fund; Additional Funding is needed Relief organizations responding to equine...

Help Us Help Horses

By Nathaniel White II, DVM, MS, DACVSSince its inception in 1994, the AAEP Foundation has allocated more than $750,000 dollars to equine research, education,...

By Nathaniel White II, DVM, MS, DACVSSince its inception in 1994, the AAEP Foundation has allocated more than $750,000 dollars to equine research, education,...

Help Us Help Horses
Overview

By Nathaniel White II, DVM, MS, DACVS

Since its inception in 1994, the AAEP Foundation has allocated more than $750,000 dollars to equine research, education, and benevolent programs that have improved the health and welfare of the horse. But the foundation is much more than a funding organization. It’s about collaborating with stakeholders to address the real equine health issues we all care about. By uniting all those dedicated to improving horse health and well-being, the foundation is organizing and delivering relevant research, education and outreach. 

The AAEP Foundation fosters the ongoing exchange of information that can make a real difference. Programs include: 

Pilot/Emergency Research Funding: More than $350,000 has been awarded to equine research since the Foundation’s inception. 

Industry Panels/Summit Sponsor and Host: We are proud to bring the world’s horse health leaders together at meetings and forums for veterinarians to learn and collaborate on the latest research and medical innovations. 

Our most recent accomplishments include the Equine Genome Panel, Laminitis Blue Ribbon Panel, Equine Respiratory Panel, and the Equine Colic Research Symposium and Panel. Future work of the foundation includes sponsorship of the first Equine Research Summit. This summit will bring together the top researchers, funding agencies, and industry representatives to discuss and prioritize research needs for the horse industry. 

Equineresearch.net: Designed to promote and identify current projects through an online catalog of ongoing research studies, this website aims to decrease unnecessary duplication of research and fosters sharing of information between researchers at universities and organizations such as the AAEP Foundation, Morris Animal Foundation, Grayson-Jockey Club Research Foundation and American Quarter Horse Association Foundation. 

Veterinary Student Scholarships: Our expanded scholarship program includes funding graduate researchers, internships, AAEP convention stipends, summer scholarships, externships, and more. 

We continue to partner annually with the American Live Stock Insurance Company to provide eight scholarships to fourth-year veterinary students. This collaboration has awarded over $350,000 in scholarships to date. 

Horse Owner Education Programs: AAEP assists with various horse owner education efforts throughout the year. 

Veterinary Student Education Programs: Throughout each school year, the AAEP Foundation sends AAEP members to veterinary schools to teach students hands-on techniques in dentistry and emergency preparedness, and we assist in hosting farrier-veterinarian short courses. 

Providing Equine Emergency and Disaster Relief: In 2005, we created an Equine Disaster Relief Fund, which has raised $100,000 in contributions. We have already allocated $50,000 to help horses through the Louisiana and Mississippi Veterinary Medical Associations in the hurricane-ravaged Gulf region. We also have coordinated supply and feed donations to these regions via our Educational Partners and others within the horse industry. 

The AAEP supports the administrative expenses of the foundation, so all donations can be used for programs that help the horse. All horse owners can support the foundation’s goal to improve horse health by making a donation. Our Equine Memorial Program remains a simple way to donate to the foundation and send a sympathy note in honor of a beloved equine companion or a friend who has experienced the loss of a horse. General donations and planned giving also are options, not to mention the needs of our Equine Disaster Relief Fund. 

For more information about the AAEP Foundation, see www.aaep.org/foundation.php, contact Robin Hollar atrhollar@aaep.org, or call (859) 233-0147.